FIRE-CAPPED TIT (Syllabus: GS Paper 2 – Env nd Eco)

News-CRUX-10     12th February 2024        
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Context: Birders have spot- ted the trail of species flying back home suggesting reverse migration as the season changes from winter to summer.

  • According to the experts, generally reverse migration begins towards the end of Feb or by first week of March, but this year the pattern suggests otherwise.


Fire-capped Tit

  • Habitat and Migration Patterns: The fire-capped tit, a forest-dwelling bird, breeds in the Himalayas and migrates to southern India, including the Western Ghats and Kerala, during winter.
  • The recent spotting in Aravalli, along with the black redstart, suggests the arrival of summer.
  • Early Signs of Reverse Migration: An early sighting of the fire-capped tit in Aravalli, hinting at a premature reverse migration, possibly 10-15 days ahead of the usual schedule.
  • Early Reverse Migration: Mild winters in central India may have prompted the bird to start moving early.
  • The early sighting might be of an individual bird, and the main population is expected to arrive later, possibly by the end of February.
  • Presence of Black Redstarts: The black redstarts, which breed in the Himalayas, Central Asia, and Europe, were spotted in large numbers, indicating a return of those that had migrated south.
  • Diverse Bird Species in the Region: The Aravalli region witnesses the arrival of over 80 bird species from October, with around 40 species making a pit stop in the area.
  • Local Breeding and Melodious Song: The fire-capped tit breeds in the Himalayas during summer and is known for its melodious song, as recorded by birder Shukla during the recent sighting in Aravalli.
Samadhaan